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NSSA World Skeet Championship: Day Two

Yesterday resulted in a championship medal in 12 gauge and a lesson in energy management. I took that lesson into the second day of shooting – Sunday, October 2nd – at the NSSA shooting complex in the mini-world skeet event.

First Event – 20 guage (4 boxes = 100 targets)

Saturday had gotten started just after noon with a final round going until 6pm. Sunday was entirely different. Starting at 9am the sun was a factor, but not directly. The sun was casting a long and dark shadow over the low house and about 10 feet along the flight of low birds when shot from the fifth and sixth stations – that would cost me dearly in the 20 gauge event.

The first box (25 targets) started out very well, I got all the way to station 5 before I realized just how bad that shadow was. I missed the low, then the low option from that station before moving on to station 6 and missing the low bird on the double from that station. That shadow was going to be a problem and I needed to figure out how to deal with it because I could not continue to shoot 22’s and expect to do well.

On the second box, I tried moving my hold point out a bit on low 5, but was still unable to hit it.. twice – for a 23.

On the third box I was able to limit my low 5 losses to 1 and finished the round with a 24.

On the final round, I ran into the shadow problem at 4 and 5 and missed on on each station for a 23. That 92 was not good enough to win anything. I am going to have to work on low house shadows when I get back to North Carolina.

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Second Event – .410 bore (4 boxes = 100 targets)

The second event on Sunday was in good light. Shooting in the afternoon, the loathsome, evil, sadistic low-house shadow was gone and visibility was good. .410 is the smallest of the shotgun shells and with only 1/2 oz of shot, you’re either on the bird or you aren’t.

The first box went fairly well. I dropped my first target on high-3 but went straight for the rest of the round for a 24.

The second round I missed  3 for a 22. The high winds were moving the birds around a bit, and sometimes, things happen.

The third round, I lost two birds, but felt good with the way I was shooting.

The final round was light’s-out. I went straight until I got to the very last bird – low 8 option. Lost. A 24 where a 25 should have been.

That left me with a 93, which I consider a good .410 score. I knew it would be enough to get something for my work, but I wasn’t sure if it was going to be another champion medal or second place.

The .410 event concluded the mini-world. That led to an interesting observation. If you were paying attention to the Day One recount, since I lost my very last target in the minis, and yesterday had missed the very first – I had missed the very first and very last target in my first registered NSSA competition.

Now, on to Day Three and the Main World Championship Event.

About Rich

Rich Mitchell is the President and CEO of RAM Arms inc. Rich is also a competitor in Skeet, sporting clays, 3-gun, Steel Challenge and USPSA.

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