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TAPCO Intrafuse SKS Stock Review

Do you have an older model gun that could use more up to date furniture? Do you like the performance of your gun but the fit just isn’t what you desire. At one time or another most of us have owned a gun that we would answer yes to one of those questions.

For myself, my old SKS is the gun that I would answer yes to both of those questions. For some time now I have been looking for the solution to those problems but had been reluctant to pull the trigger on a replacement stock. The cure to the SKS’s problems came from the fine folks over at TAPCO.

We at Typical Shooter had contacted TAPCO about testing some of their products to be able to pass what we found on to you. When the package arrived there was a TAPCO Intrafuse Stock System along with their short vertical grip and a bipod. Needless to say I was like a kid on Christmas morning.

TAPCO produces several variations of their Intrafuse Stock System for the SKS. There are different colors, number of accessory rails or even whether you want be capable of keeping the bayonet mounted on your SKS. One of the nice features of the stock is the six position adjustable butt stock and the added rail on the top of the upper hand guard. The model TAPCO sent eliminated the slot to house the bayonet but in its place was an added accessory rail, perfect for a vertical grip or other accessory. Another nice thing is every package was marked, “MADE IN THE USA”.

I proceeded to tear down the SKS from its stock configuration to install the TAPCO system. TAPCO must have known that the Intrafuse System was coming to a man because the package did not contain instructions (not like most of us would start by reading them anyways ). If you are one that prefers instructions you can find instructions on TAPCO’s website, an SKS manual or here on Typical Shooter. The install was straight forward and uncomplicated. The time to tear down the SKS and rebuild it on the TAPCO platform (including cleaning and taking pictures) was just over 30 minutes. While I was at it I installed a receiver cover (purchased several years ago) that incorporated a see through optics mount for I can still use the iron sights.

**Retraction- TAPCO actually does include instructions. They are printed on the back of the package. Like the typical man I passed them by.**

Once the new furniture was installed I tried it on to see how it fit from multiple carry positions and butt stock settings. I found the two lowest setting of the butt stock most comfortable.

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The next day I went to pull the trigger and throw some lead down range and see how the Intrafuse stood up to use on the firing line. There was an unmistakable difference in how the SKS handled. Even without the vertical grip installed it was much more comfortable to shoot. With the vertical grip installed it shot like a precision tactical weapon. It was much easier to get the SKS in position and on target. After several rounds I could no longer resist the rapid fire test. Needless to say the new found control was very welcomed. After about half of a 30 round magazine at the fastest fire rate I could get, I was officially impressed. There was virtually no muzzle rise the entire time and it was the most comfortable experience ever with the SKS.

To use the bipod mentioned earlier it was as simple as pulling the plug from the bottom of the vertical grip and inserting the top of the bipod. The rounded feet of the bipod made it smooth and easy to move the gun to any target area. My only complaint about the bipod would be that it did not secure to the vertical grip very well due to the grip being the short model. I am confident the bipod would secure better to the longer vertical grip being that it would have more room to be fully inserted.

The most noticeable things about the vertical grip would have to be the comfort and increased control. The short grip is just the right length to be able to grip comfortably and still give you the room needed to remove a 30 round magazine without interference from the vertical grip.

If you are looking to make your SKS more functional and better looking there is no doubt the TAPCO Intrafuse Stock System would be a great choice. Especially being you can pick one up for less than $100 ($84.99 list price).

Now it is time for the hard part, take the TAPCO products off and box them back up and return them. I definitely know what to put on my “Gun Gear” want list after feeling the Intrafuse  System in action.

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Happy shooting and God bless you and yours

James

About James

4 comments

  1. looks good, looks like it feels good as well. Who says you cannot teach an old dog new tricks!

  2. Thanks, and yes it feels wonderful. Like I stated in the article, the stability in rapid fire surprised me. And the looks are improved dramatically. Now I have (another) reason to stock up more ammo.

  3. I keep looking at various reviews, but have yet to find an answer to this question about the Tapco Intrafuse SKS stock(of course, I haven’t asked on any of those forums that seem to be dominated by “I don’t own one or even have an SKS, but I shoor wanna and from the pics, it looks kewl and ez to do”): How much more difficult does this stock make breaking the firearm completely down for cleaning? I have had my Norinco mated with an ATI Fiberforce Druganov style stock (I’m pretty sure that what it is…there were only 2 stocks I can remember availbable back then, both from ATI-a Druganov SVD style, or a pistol-grip with collapsible stock style) for close to 20 years. Though you can get the trigger assembly off without too much difficulty, it is nowhere near as easy as on the wooden “stock” stock. Also, that ATI stock has a ramp built into it behind the receiver cover that makes you remove the entire action from the stock to be able to remove the receiver cover. Do you have to remove the pistol grip every time you want to remove the trigger assembly and clean it on the Tapco Intrafuse?

    • You would have to remove the grip every time you want remove the trigger group. I can see why TAPCO had to design it that way. If they would have designed it the other way around your hand would be too far back from the trigger to get a good contact with the trigger. But with only one simple bolt to remove it is worth the added comfort and control.

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